COACH’S SPRING ’18 CAMPAIGN IS A GRITTY, GLAM ODE TO NEW YORK

by Beatrice Hazlehurst  12/19/17 at 10:38AM on PaperMag.com

In the age of fast fashion, when we are a consistently forced to sacrifice style for quality, or quality for price, we’re desperately seeking something that will last for the long haul — enter Coach. A Coach is handbag not just a purse, it’s a tried and true American staple. As we are offered a new host of trends to consider every season and, as a result, must evaluate our attachment to that two seasons-old ruched, leopard-print crop top, a Coach bag is something that will stand the test of time, as well as the “Marie Kondo” method.

The latest campaign from the fashion house celebrates both the spontaneity and sheer energy of the New York girl. Each piece feels fresh and exciting, full of contrasting prints and thoughtful details, while somehow still managing to feel cohesive on top of maintaining Coach’s classic charm. There’s a special “je ne sais quois” about the collection, without ever trying too hard. With Coach’s re-gear towards millennial audience (read: Selena Gomez’s truly iconic collaboration), the brand has never been more coveted. Read our chat with creative director Stuart Vevers and see Coach’s spring ad campaign, premiered by PAPER, below.

Describe the Coach woman.

The Coach girl is authentic, honest and mixes a cool attitude with romantic charm. The Coach girl has a spontaneous and effortless approach to style — she’s someone who takes pieces and really makes them their own.

What do you feel you’ve contributed to Coach as it’s evolved?

Coach is known as America’s house of leather, but I’m really proud that Coach is now also known as a fashion house.

What was your vision for this collection in particular?

Coach’s spring collection is about shine, sparkle and grit. It’s the Coach girl’s downtown, undone take on dressing up, but I still wanted it to feel grounded and have that New York City attitude… Keith Haring’s graphics are really pivotal to the collection. I’ve always loved his work, even more so since I’ve lived in New York. He had a democratic, un-precious approach to art. I wanted to create a new context for his work and do something unexpected with it.